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ginny

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Reply with quote  #1 
We have some really good ideas about back to school in various threads in the message board archives.   These ideas were sent to me from Ruth at the CVSA Office:

Back to school season can be both exhilarating and challenging for the whole family. A mix of excitement and nerves about new teachers and hard classes; relief and regret that summer is ending; a host of to-do items to check off the list before the first day. We recommend writing a letter to your child's teachers and anyone else who interacts with your child at school - the school nurse, librarian, bus driver, etc. This letter should include things like:

  • An explanation of your child's condition and how it will impact his or her classroom experience
  • Accommodations that may be needed during the school day
  • What you have found to be effective preventive, management, and treatment strategies
  • A list of your child's medications, doses, and when s/he takes them
  • How the child's learning may be affected and how the teacher can help (such as a plan for catching your child up in class if excessive absences occur)

In addition to the letter for all people who interact with your child, establish one person at school who is responsible for your child and create an emergency protocol for this person. For a sample letter and other back to school tips, check out our how-to guide

Best,

Alyson

===========================
Alyson Krokosky, MS, CGC | Assistant Director of Genetics Resources and Services
Genetic Alliance | 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW | Suite 404 | Washington, DC 20008
Phone: 202.966.5557 x218 | Fax: 202.966.8553


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ginny CVSA Moderator
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ginny

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Reply with quote  #2 
Helpful information first posted by Shannis mom and bumped back up by Pattie Mahler:

This came up 2 years ago when Shannon was in 2nd grade. I wanted to post it again for anyone who may not know about it only because it has worked so well for us and I know Riley and a few others from the board have implemented it in there schools too.  

 

Shannon keeps a red index card on her desk at school. Her 2nd grade teacher devised this and used it for the whole class. When Shanni is in prodrome, it is difficult for her to speak. She either is quiet, mumbles or can't actually talk for fear of vomiting if she opens her mouth. So, should she need to leave class she simply picks up her card and holds it up in the air. The teacher will stop what they are doing mid sentence and address a red card. It's along the line of a red flag. Some kids use it for the bathroom etc. but it was put in place for Shannon. This way, the teacher doesn't look at a hand and say "just wait til I finish explaining" or misunderstand the hand in the air as a routine question instead of a problem needing immediate attention. Getting to the nurse and getting her meds in the shortest period of time makes a huge difference for Shannon. I am happy to say that Shannon is in 4th grade now and still has this in place (it's in her 504 plan!). Many of the teachers at our school have it in their classrooms too. She had a phenominal 2nd grade teacher who was such a gift to us by coming up with this.

 

So, for those of you who have gone through what we went through of vomiting in class because you couldn't just leave, this was a great solution. For those that already knew about it, sorry but I thought it was worth repeating.


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ginny CVSA Moderator
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