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demoncleaner

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Reply with quote  #1 
small sized study, but pretty interesting results given this was using SMOKED cannabis, not oral preparations.  Why is Israel one of the only countries doing studies like these!  almost 50% remission rate over 8 weeks, with intractable cases is pretty remarkable.

Quote:

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been reported to produce beneficial effects for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, but this has not been investigated in controlled trials. We performed a prospective trial to determine whether cannabis can induce remission in patients with Crohn's disease.

METHODS:

We studied 21 patients (mean age, 40 ± 14 y; 13 men) with Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) scores greater than 200 who did not respond to therapy with steroids, immunomodulators, or anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents. Patients were assigned randomly to groups given cannabis, twice daily, in the form of cigarettes containing 115 mg of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or placebo containing cannabis flowers from which the THC had been extracted. Disease activity and laboratory tests were assessed during 8 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks thereafter.

RESULTS:

Complete remission (CDAI score, <150) was achieved by 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group (45%) and 1 of 10 in the placebo group (10%; P = .43). A clinical response (decrease in CDAI score of >100) was observed in 10 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group (90%; from 330 ± 105 to 152 ± 109) and 4 of 10 in the placebo group (40%; from 373 ± 94 to 306 ± 143; P = .028). Three patients in the cannabis group were weaned from steroid dependency. Subjects receiving cannabis reported improved appetite and sleep, with no significant side effects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the primary end point of the study (induction of remission) was not achieved, a short course (8 weeks) of THC-rich cannabis produced significant clinical, steroid-free benefits to 10 of 11 patients with active Crohn's disease, compared with placebo, without side effects. Further studies, with larger patient groups and a nonsmoking mode of intake, are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01040910.

Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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demoncleaner

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Posts: 277
Reply with quote  #2 
giggling at the thought of the vibrating pill, .....just.....funny visuals...lol

I think the whole "slows motility" is a crock of doody. I have never experienced it. lets just say, you have firsthand experience with motility diagnostics [wink]   you draw your conclusions from there as to how well you think they have a handle on understanding it. its speculation, not like, when you take an opiate and its OBVIOUS it causes motility issues. pure conjecture, with crap test data to back it up.
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demoncleaner

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Reply with quote  #3 
that would be entirely too logical
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Jay

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Reply with quote  #4 
i think it's foolish to say that cannabis doesn't affect motility at ALL.  I just think that since the plant has so many different types by now some types will react differently.  I mean we're living in the time where I can get weed for X disease and it does affect that stuff.  However I'm pretty sure the motility issue would vary from person to person.  It's always different, I'm not saying it for sure happens or doesn't happen, I just think it needs to be tested more clinically to find out HOW/WHEN/WHY? MJ affects motility for X body type ect, from strain to strain?
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demoncleaner

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Reply with quote  #5 
I was speaking to the wide range of results displayed by most current motility studies.  So motility studies are sketchy to begin with.  (and data regarding Cannabis and motility comes from animal motility studies....lol. it is not data taken from humans) I am also speaking to Amber, about HER case. I would not advise opiates for her for instance, they would be contraindicated in her state. I would not hesitate to consider CBD or med mj, due to its safety and efficacy.

Just speaking from my 30 years of nearly daily use. I have never PERSONALLY observed any motility issues. I am sensitive to my body and have observed effects by any number of other substances well known to upset motility. 

Cannabis does effect motility, it is just a very mild effect, nothing like opiates or coffee for instance. Its use is not going to be contraindicated by someone with a compromised digestive system, and indeed appears to be quite beneficial to an imbalanced/inflamed digestive system.  the therapeutic evidence for its effects in inflammatory bowel conditions, overrides any effects from slightly reduced motility, when we are discussing its use in patient populations such as our own.

It just goes against common sense. Cannabis famously stimulates the appetite, and relaxes the bowels.  When you stimulate your appetite, you stimulate your ENTIRE digestive system, it starts in the brain and tells you body it is time to eat, and natural processes like saliva and stomach acid secretion start. they will probably find it RESTORES motility to a proper rhythm when they actually get around to looking at people instead of Rats.


google "Cannabinoids and intestinal motility: welcome to CB2 receptors" for an interesting read on the subject, effects upon inflammatory response, etc.


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Jay

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Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #6 
I'm just saying basically, just because Our personal motility effects happen to be slight, it doesn't mean some people would have a bad reaction. I'm definitely on the support MMJ wagon, but I;ve also witnessed firsthand some people having bad reactions to grass, so the opposite from normally, the small ratio of people who have problems is going to be highlighted by everyone else who has an axe to grind about MJ in general, I just like to acknowledge that it's a hard thing to quantify absolutely, because of all the differences in types of dope and types of metabolisms? 
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demoncleaner

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Posts: 277
Reply with quote  #7 
Was just reading the largest case study on CHS to date out of Mayo. among the findings:

Quote:
The peripheral CB1 receptors of the enteric nerves have also been implicated in slowing gastrointestinal transit.  Previously, it was suggested that decreased gastric emptying induced by cannabis use might be responsible for the recurrent emesis seen with CH.  However , the majority of our patients had either normal or increased gastric transit.  Also, the patients did not have features suggestive of delayed gastric emptying , such as early satiety, bloating, or postprandial predominance of symptoms.


Interesting study, it is something to see the constant CVS parallels drawn throughout the paper.  The study stipulates that hot showering is a key component to CHS, saying that it is the only vomiting condition that elicits that behavior, when we see it in a high number of our own patient population that DO NOT use cannabis at all.  This indicates that it is effective therapy when battling chronic painful nausea, and not abhorrent behavior caused by cannabis usage.  They draw parallels to CVS, but then discount important crossover behavior such as hydrotherapy.

they are not looking at DIET as a causal factor in either CVS or CHS and I think that is a big part of the equation.  A lot of these issues can be caused by carb loading.  Stoners NOTORIOUSLY carb load, frequently RIGHT BEFORE BED, day in, day out. They stop smoking, they stop having crazy food cravings. Their symptoms clear up.  Same as the guy that continues to smoke, but cleans up his diet.  Its not the weed. When they find something in an animal model, such as CB1 receptor agonism, and come up with a theory that it is affecting motility, the theory does not hold up in human observations, in fact the CONTRARY result is observed with either normal or accelerated motility in this particular subset of 100 patients.  The fact that such a small subset of mj smokers ever develop CH, in relation to the millions of people that use it, indicates that it is probably not the cannabis, and something else, like diet, that is not being associated.  They had people in this study that only smoked ONCE A WEEK!  it is patently ABSURD to think that that level of usage could result in CVS type symptoms! 
  
There is very little real world observation of Cannabis having any substantial effect on gastric emptying in Humans.
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